First Time Growing Shashamane Sativa

One of the reasons I hold Shashamane sativa in high regard is because it produces strong stimulating and energizing cerebral effects, similar to a cold shower in the morning. This landrace sativa from Ethiopia also produces a good amount of kief and makes some unforgettable and highly potent hash.

In addition, the buds have such a nice appeal, especially with the orange hairs that pop on mature buds. I must admit that this is my second attempt at growing weed. The first time for me was more of a learning experience since I was all about trial and error.

My First Time Smoking Shashamane Sativa

The first time I encountered Shashamane sativa was in Nairobi, Kenya back in 2013. It was a random weekday afternoon when my phone rang. I answered the call without hesitation and my friend Edwin sounded really excited.

“ I’m smoking Shash!” he announced. “Make sure to carry some money.”

I already knew Edwin was at the dealer’s house, a five-minute walking distance from home. My wallet contained $30 and I quickly left the house eager to try out the new strain. It was one of the best afternoons ever!

Unfortunately, the dealer that supplied it ran into some problems with the cops a month later and had to permanently relocate to Mombasa,  located 500 kilometers south of Nairobi where I reside. Edwin and I spent several months hunting for the tasty and highly potent Shashamane to no avail.

It wasn’t until August 2014 that I smoked Shashamane sativa again thanks to one of my neighbors whom I hung out with frequently. My neighbor, Ian, was a  final year student at a nearby university and used to meet with the weedman on campus. While the weed delivered value for money, the dealer sold mid-size joints only and they were expensive.

First Time Growing Shashamane Sativa

Ian graduated in July 2015 and relocated to a different city immediately after getting hired at a local microfinance bank. Fortunately, he introduced me to his dealer several months before his departure.

Stepping Up To Half A Pound

It was on a Thursday afternoon back in 2017 and I was at a bus stop along the Nairobi-Thika highway. I happened to spot my former classmate, Dennis, from high school whom I still kept in touch with on Facebook. We were excited to see each other after several years since he’s from a small town that’s a three-hour drive from Nairobi.

“Let me show you where I stay and we’ll also smoke a bag,” Dennis suggested.

“Okay, let’s go,” I agreed.

We arrived at Dennis’ small apartment and then bought a $20 bag containing 10 grams. I left several hours later feeling joyful because my friend showed me where to buy dubs of Shashamane affordably. I remember visiting him one afternoon around November 2017 and he had the biggest smile across his face that got me curious.

“Take a look,” he reached under the coffee table, and in his hands was a black plastic bag filled with dense, bright green, and sweet-smelling Shashamane buds.

Big Shashamane Sativa Bud

I couldn’t believe my eyes.

 It was like winning a jackpot! As fate would have it, I had just received my weekly pay from working freelance writing gigs. Dennis quickly got his phone and called the plug for a delivery…and that’s how I bought my first half a pound of Shashamane sativa!

Selecting Shashamane Sativa Seeds For Planting Outdoors

I’ve always desired to grow cannabis and that’s why I collect landrace seeds across East Africa. I decided to turn my wish into a reality and decided to grow Shashamane sativa for the first time towards the end of June this year.

Shashamane Sativa Seeds

Cannabis growers who harvest big yields often take time to select high-quality mature seeds for planting. As you can see in the picture below, I made sure to choose dark seeds that are big and won’t pop when squeezed between the thumbs. It’s no problem getting fresh Shashamane sativa seeds because I buy a pound or two every month. 

Soil Preparation

The best medium that’s readily available and affordable for my project is black loam soil. YouTube suggested different types of packaged soils made specifically for growing cannabis however the shipping costs and Value Added Tax (VAT) of importing them to Kenya are through the roof.

The short rainfall present in June made it easy for me to break the ground and dig up fresh soil using a garden hoe. Ten minutes later, my 5-gallon bucket was half-full and I even saw several worms wriggling around. Next, I added two handfuls of dried cow dung on top of the soil and spread the manure evenly.

 I added another layer of loam soil on top of the previous one until it reached the three-quarter mark. YouTube also suggested drilling holes near the base of the bucket to drain out excess water and I followed the advice promptly.

Hello Shashamane Seedlings!

90% of the seeds I selected for this project germinated into a bunch of healthy seedlings. Perhaps it was because I didn’t overwater them, unlike my first time growing Isibania sativa back in 2014.

I dipped my pinky finger about one-thirds into the soil before planting the seeds. This method ensures that each seed receives sufficient water while the budding tap roots from the germinating seeds gain a firm foundation underground.

The Shashamane sativa seedlings in the video below are just five days old!

Shashamane Sativa Seedlings
Click image to watch video on Google Drive

Vegging and Stress Training

I was so happy to see the seedlings thriving every day that I forgot to top the plant you see in the video. Around mid-July, the plants received organic manure in the form of dry cow dung. 

This eight-week-old Shashamane plant that I grew separately developed a firm stem and some large healthy leaves.

Click image to watch video on Google Drive

As you can see below, the plant is in stress training after I bent the stem gently and tied at a 90-degree angle. I hope to get at least three masters then tie a cage around for extra support.

Click image to watch video on Google Drive

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